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April 2021

Monday, 26 April 2021 00:00

How to Prevent Foot Blisters

Although they can be annoying and uncomfortable, most blisters that occur on the feet are harmless and appear as the result of friction from shoes rubbing repeatedly against a specific area of the skin. There are several steps that you can take to prevent blisters. First, it is important to have the right footwear. It is imperative that the shoes that are worn fit properly, and moisture-wicking socks can also be worn to protect the feet and keep them cool and dry. If you have areas on your feet that are prone to blistering, padding those areas by wearing a moleskin bandage over them may help prevent the blisters from developing. If you are performing an activity, such as running, and you feel pain or discomfort in your feet or that the skin on your feet has become red and irritated, it is suggested that you cease the activity immediately to avoid blister formation. For more information about how to prevent blisters, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD of Salem Foot Care . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How Do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 19 April 2021 00:00

Biomechanic Effects of Footwear

The study of the movement and structure of living organisms is known as biomechanics. Podiatrists have long been interested in biomechanics not only in regard to the treatment of certain foot, ankle, and gait disorders, but also in the biomechanic effects of certain footwear. Shoes—as the line of defense between the body and the ground—are integral to how people control the movement of their bodies and lower limbs in particular. Along with offering the feet support and protection, wearing shoes when walking allows for better muscle movement and longer strides. Footwear that is designed for optimal foot biomechanics is believed by some to be particularly beneficial to those with chronic ankle instability by reducing the extension of the ankle and improving gait. If you are interested in learning more about how different shoes change the biomechanics of your feet, or are experiencing any weakness in your ankles, contact a podiatrist.

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD from Salem Foot Care . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 13 April 2021 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Published in Blog
Monday, 12 April 2021 00:00

What is Morton’s Neuroma?

Women who wear high heels and are in their 30s and 40s are most at risk of developing Morton’s neuroma: a thickening of nerve tissues between bones on the bottom of the toes. This can cause a burning pain in the ball of the foot that graduates to a numbness or intense pins-and-needles feeling between the 3rd and 4th toes. Typical treatment for those with Morton’s neuroma calls for a change in footwear, either OTC or prescription painkillers and anti-inflammatory medications. If the condition persists for more than a year, a possible surgical solution to remove the damaged nerve or an endoscopic decompression to fix the nerve may become necessary. To learn more about treatment for Morton’s neuroma, please consult with a podiatrist.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD of Salem Foot Care . Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Corns and calluses are both hardened layers of dead skin that can develop on the feet to protect them from stress, irritation and rubbing that has occurred over a period of time—usually as a result of wearing ill-fitting shoes or friction between the toes. The difference between corns and calluses is where they are located: calluses are on the bottom of the toes, and corns are on a bony area on the top of the foot. Corns also have a thick “core” of skin at their base and are either hard (on the top of the toes), or soft (between the toes). Corns, like calluses, can be painful and cause difficulty walking. Occasionally, a little blood may collect where the skin of the foot and the corn meet and cause discoloration or even split the skin and allow an infection to possibly occur. You can help avoid getting a corn by wearing properly sized shoes with plenty of room for the toes to move. If the corn does not go away on its own over several months, or is causing pain or difficulty walking, a podiatrist may relieve discomfort or even remove pressure and pain from the area by safely shaving away some of the dead skin. They may also be able to correct any structural issue you might have using orthotics to distribute weight more evenly.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD of Salem Foot Care . Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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