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August 2020

Monday, 31 August 2020 00:00

What Is Cuboid Subluxation?

The cuboid bone is a cube-shaped bone that is located along the outer side of the foot and provides stability to the foot. A cuboid subluxation happens when this bone is displaced from its normal position, causing pain and impaired function. This condition commonly affects athletes like dancers and runners, who use their feet to push off the ground. Diagnosing cuboid subluxation requires a thorough evaluation by a podiatrist, and may include imaging, such as an ultrasound. Treatment depends on the severity of the injury, but usually consists of conservative measures, such as cuboid manipulations, bracing or taping the affected foot, orthotics, rest, and foot and ankle strengthening exercises. Following successful treatment, most patients are quickly back on their feet and resuming their usual activities. If you have a foot injury, it is recommended that you visit a podiatrist.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Scott Matthews, DPM, MD from Salem Foot Care . Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 24 August 2020 00:00

Relieving Heel Spur Pain by Stretching

Heel pain can occur for a variety of reasons, one of them being a condition known as heel spurs. A heel spur is a bony growth that develops around the heel bone, often causing pain and sometimes inflammation. The sharp bony protrusion can press into the supporting structures of the feet, which is why someone with a heel spur may express an intense stinging or sharp pain felt in the heel. It’s been found that keeping the feet both strong and flexible, can help in easing the symptoms of a heel spur. Looking into particular stretches for strengthening the feet and improving their flexibility is a great method for reducing pain caused by heel spurs. For more information on what stretches can help ease the pain of a heel spur, please consult with a podiatrist.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD from Salem Foot Care . Our doctor will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Looking after and staying on top of the health of your feet is an important part of living with diabetes. Even seemingly small problems can have serious consequences. A cut or scrape may go unnoticed due to reduced circulation and sensation in the feet, and this same cut or scrape can turn into a deep wound. Left untreated, the wound can become infected and increase the risk of needing an amputation. To avoid these complications it is suggested that people with diabetes inspect their feet daily, wear clean and comfortable shoes, avoid walking barefoot, and never treat corns and calluses on their own. Periodic checkups by a podiatrist to continuously assess foot health is highly recommended. If you have diabetes, consult with a podiatrist today who can help you take care of your feet.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Scott Matthews, DPM, MD from Salem Foot Care . Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Published in Blog
Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Where Is the Achilles Tendon Located?

The medical term for the Achilles tendon is the calcaneal tendon. It is located in the back of the leg, and connects the calf muscles to the heel. It is considered to be one of the longest tendons in the body, and is used during walking and running activities. An injury to the Achilles tendon may occur as a result of not warming up adequately before beginning an exercise program. Achilles tendonitis or a rupture can cause severe pain and discomfort. Patients may be susceptible to experiencing this type of injury with existing flat feet or tight calf muscles. There are prevention techniques that can be implemented which may help to reduce the risk of incurring an Achilles tendon injury. These can include stretching before any type of exercise is pursued, in addition to wearing shoes that fit correctly. If you have pain in your heel or if your calf muscles are stiff, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat Achilles tendon injuries.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD of Salem Foot Care . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Patients who have pain between the toes may be experiencing a condition that is referred to as Morton’s neuroma. This condition is a result of a compressed nerve and can be caused by wearing shoes that do not fit properly. Additionally, it may occur from participating in sporting activities such as running and dancing. Some patients have a foot structure that can lead to developing this ailment, and existing foot conditions including hammertoes and bunions may contribute to the onset of Morton’s neuroma. The pain and discomfort can range from a tingling to a burning sensation, and can radiate to the ball of the foot. If you have pain in this part of your foot, it is strongly recommended that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat this condition.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD of Salem Foot Care . Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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